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dc.contributor.authorHughes, Jane M
dc.contributor.authorHuey, Joel A
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, Alison J
dc.contributor.authorBaggiano, Olivier
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:07:09Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:07:09Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2014-09-24T04:59:31Z
dc.identifier.issn2075-4450
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/insects2040447
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44469
dc.description.abstractStudies of connectivity of natural populations are often conducted at different timescales. Studies that focus on contemporary timescales ask questions about dispersal abilities and dispersal behavior of their study species. In contrast, studies conducted at historical timescales are usually more focused on evolutionary or biogeographic questions. In this paper we present a synthesis of connectivity studies that have addressed both these timescales in Australian Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera. We conclude that: (1) For both groups, the major mechanism of dispersal is by adult flight, with larval drift playing a very minor role and with unusual patterns of genetic structure at fine scales explained by the "patchy recruitment hypothesis"; (2) There is some evidence presented to suggest that at slightly larger spatial scales (~100 km) caddisflies may be slightly more connected than mayflies; (3) Examinations of three species at historical timescales showed that, in southeast Queensland Australia, despite there being no significant glaciation during the Pleistocene, there are clear impacts of Pleistocene climate changes on their genetic structure; and (4) The use of mitochondrial DNA sequence data has uncovered a number of cryptic species complexes in both trichopterans and ephemeropterans. We conclude with a number of suggestions for further work.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent764815 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI Publishing
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom447
dc.relation.ispartofpageto461
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInsects
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFreshwater Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060204
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0608
dc.titleAquatic Insects in Eastern Australia: A Window on Ecology and Evolution of Dispersal in Streams
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, author. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHughes, Jane M.
gro.griffith.authorHuey, Joel A.
gro.griffith.authorMcLean, Alison J.
gro.griffith.authorBaggiano, Olivier


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