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dc.contributor.convenorMing-Jer Chenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrunetto, Yvonneen_US
dc.contributor.authorTeo, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorShacklock, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarr-Wharton, Rodneyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:22:54Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:22:54Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-04-30T22:28:45Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44663
dc.description.abstractRetention of police officers in most countries has been a critical issue. Police officers in many OECD countries are experiencing an increasing level of occupational stress due to their heavy workload and the emotional nature of policing (such as dealing with people and having to make speedy decisions that could have serious physical, health, social or other impacts on the community). There is also an increase in the level of accountability being placed on policing by the community and the government, as a result of the implementation of new public managerial reforms. The current study examines the effect of emotional intelligence upon the job satisfaction, wellbeing and engagement of police officers in explaining their organizational commitment and turnover intentions. Survey responses from 193 police officers in Australia were analyzed using Partial Least Squares Path Modeling. As predicted, the emotional nature of policing leads to emotional intelligence, which leads to job satisfaction and wellbeing. These paths also have a positive relationship leading to employee engagement and organizational commitment. These relationships resulted in lower turnover intentions. Organizational commitment was found to partially mediate the causal relationship between employee engagement and turnover intentions. The findings of this research have important theoretical and practical implications for police officer retention.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent222737 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAcademy of Management Procedingsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUSAen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://annualmeeting.aomonline.org/2011/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAcademy of Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle71st Annual Academy of Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-08-12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-12-16en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSan Antonio, Texasen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Resources Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150305en_US
dc.titlePolicing, Emotional Intelligence and Turnover Intentionsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE2 - Conference Publications (Non HERDC Eligible)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Academy of Management (AOM). This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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