Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMoyle, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurfield, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorVenturato, Lorraineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:00:17Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:00:17Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:06:37Z
dc.identifier.issn03092402en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05912.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44720
dc.description.abstractAbstract Aims. This article reports on a study of quality of life of older people with dementia, as assessed by the person with dementia, family carer and care staff. Background. People with dementia can give meaningful assessments of their quality of life, but these often differ from proxy ratings. In understanding this discrepancy, the influence of age, extent of cognitive impairment and activity limitation has been investigated. A lack of conclusive associations between quality of life ratings and these variables indicates a need for further research. Methods. Fifty-eight triads comprising the person with dementia, family carer and member of care staff from four long-term care facilities were surveyed on the Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease questionnaire between August and December 2007. Results. There was an important difference in the Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease questionnaire total mean scores between groups, with the person with dementia providing the highest ratings. Level of impairment in Activities of Daily Living had an important effect on quality of life ratings, with proxies, particularly care staff, providing lower ratings when there was greater activity limitation. This was not replicated for assessments made by the person with dementia. Age or level of cognitive impairment did not influence any ratings. Conclusion. People with dementia can give assessments of their quality of life. However, discrepancy in ratings, with greater activity limitation affecting proxy ratings but not those made by the person with dementia, indicates the importance of including both self-report and proxy measures in research and care planning.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2237en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2246en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Advanced Nursingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume68en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAged Care Nursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111001en_US
dc.titleAssessing quality of life of older people with dementia: a comparison of quantitative self-report and proxy accountsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record