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dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Justinen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Juliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeijzers, Gerbenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Marianneen_US
dc.contributor.authorLind, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorSparks, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Louiseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:00:14Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:00:14Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:08:13Z
dc.identifier.issn1472-0205en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/emermed-2011-200230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44744
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT Objective To describe the incidence, characteristics and outcomes of patients with influenza-like symptoms presenting to 27 public hospital emergency departments (EDs) in Queensland, Australia. Methods A descriptive retrospective study covering 5 years (2005e9) of historical data from 27 hospital EDs was undertaken. State-wide hospital ED Information System data were analysed. Annual comparisons between influenza and non-influenza cases were made across the southern hemisphere influenza season (JuneeSeptember) each year. Results Influenza-related presentations increased significantly over the 5 years from 3.4% in 2005 to 9.4% in 2009, reflecting a 276% relative increase. Differences over time regarding characteristics of patients with influenza-like symptoms, based on the influenza season, occurred for admission rate (decreased over time from 28% in 2005 to 18% in 2009), length of stay (decreased over time from a median of 210 min in 2005 to 164 min in 2009) and access block (increased over time from 33% to 41%). Also, every year there was a significantly (p<0.001) higher percentage of access block in the influenza cohort than in the non-influenza cohort. Conclusions Although there was a large increase over time in influenza-related ED presentations, most patients were discharged home from the ED. Special consideration of health service delivery management (eg, establishing an 'influenza clinic border protection and public rollout of vaccination, beginning with those most at risk') for this group of patients is warranted but requires evaluation. These results may inform planning for service delivery models during the influenza season.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent467740 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom725en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto731en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmergency Medicine Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume29en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399en_US
dc.titleImpact of influenza across 27 public emergency departments in Australia: a 5-year descriptive studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/en_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2011. For information about this journal please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors. Articles are licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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