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dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHutchings, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.authorChetty, Sylvieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:57:01Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:57:01Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:06:26Z
dc.identifier.issn09388249en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11575-011-0109-9en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44791
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we focus on the differences between born-globals and older firms. We compare whether cultural proximity is important for born-globals and older firms and whether international or technological knowledge drives their internationalisation. In addition, we compare whether born-globals and older firms are proactive or reactive in their choice of culturally proximate markets. 0 Our research suggests that born-globals tend to internationalise rapidly into markets ready to adopt their technology. This is driven by the need to establish a revenue stream (cash flow) as quickly as possible. These born-globals usually seek larger advanced economies, which are often culturally similar (proximate) and offer economies of scale; reducing risk for inexperienced firms. Indeed, born-global firms are more willing than older firms to move from culturally proximate to culturally non-proximate markets very quickly. 0 Utilising an abductive approach based on case studies, our findings show that born-globals use their technological knowledge and networks and are proactive when they enter culturally non-proximate markets. Born-globals must assess a new market for its ability to provide a revenue stream very soon after entry. If the culturally proximate market does not offer this, then they will leverage technological knowledge and networks to move rapidly into nearby non-proximate markets where they perceive better opportunities for building a customer base or new funding alternatives to sustain the firm in their early foreign market forays. 0 Our research significantly extends theory in highlighting that born-globals rely more on technological experience and display proactive behaviour more than older firms which can draw on previous international experience.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent430004 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBetriebswirtschaftlicher Verlag Dr. Th. Gabler GmbHen_US
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom425en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto460en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalManagement International Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume52en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150399en_US
dc.titleBorn-Globals and Culturally Proximate Marketsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Betriebswirtschaftlicher Verlag Dr. Th. Gabler GmbH. This is an electronic version of an article published in Management International Review, June 2012, Volume 52, Issue 3, pp 425-460. Management International Review is available online at: http://link.springer.com// with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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