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dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Faruken_US
dc.contributor.authorR. Khan, Moududuren_US
dc.contributor.authorAkhtaruzzaman, Mohammaden_US
dc.contributor.authorKarim, Rezaulen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Gailen_US
dc.contributor.authorTorlesse, Harrieten_US
dc.contributor.authorDarnton-Hill, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorDalmiya, Nitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorP. Banu, Cadien_US
dc.contributor.authorNahar, Badrunen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:56:52Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:56:52Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2012-06-07T22:10:23Z
dc.identifier.issn00223166en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3945/jn.109.119123en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/44874
dc.description.abstractPrevious short-term supplementation studies showed no additional hematologic benefit of multiple micronutrients (MMN) compared with iron + folic acid (IFA) in adolescent girls. This study examines whether long-term once- or twice-weekly supplementation of MMN can improve hemoglobin (Hb) and micronutrient status more than twice-weekly IFA supplementation in anemic adolescent girls in Bangladesh. Anemic girls (n = 324) aged 11-17 y attending rural schools were given once- or twice-weekly MMN or twice-weekly IFA, containing 60 mg iron/dose in both supplements, for 52 wk in a randomized double-blind trial. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 26 and 52 wk. Intent to treat analysis showed no significant difference in the Hb concentration between treatments at either 26 or 52 wk. However, after excluding girls with hemoglobinopathy and adjustment for baseline Hb, a greater increase in Hb was observed with twice-weekly MMN at 26 wk (P = 0.045). Although all 3 treatments effectively reduced iron deficiency, once-weekly MMN produced significantly lower serum ferritin concentrations than the other treatments at both 26 and 52 wk. Both once- and twice-weekly MMN significantly improved riboflavin, vitamin A, and vitamin C status compared with IFA. Overall, once-weekly MMN was less efficacious than twice-weekly MMN in improving iron, riboflavin, RBC folic acid, and vitamin A levels. Micronutrient supplementation beyond 26 wk was likely important in sustaining improved micronutrient status. These findings highlight the potential usefulness of MMN intervention in this population and have implications for programming.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Nutritionen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://jn.nutrition.org/content/140/10/1879.abstracten_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1879en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1886en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Journal of Nutritionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume140en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111199en_US
dc.titleLong-Term Intermittent Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation Enhances Hemoglobin and Micronutrient Status More Than Iron plus Folic Acid Supplementation in Bangladeshi Rural Adolescent Girls with Nutritional Anemiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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