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dc.contributor.convenorAssociate Professor Paul Maginen_US
dc.contributor.authorVella, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDale, Allanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCottrell, Alisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorPert, Petinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Boben_US
dc.contributor.authorBoon, Helenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitehouse, Hilaryen_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, Roen_US
dc.contributor.authorBabacan, Hurriyeten_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorGooch, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.editorAssociate Professor Paul Maginen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:55:06Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:55:06Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-15T23:02:05Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.wpsc2011.com.au/index.htmlen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/45262
dc.description.abstractSettlements and communities in tropical Queensland are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an uncertain social, economic and environmental future. At the same time, these socially and economically vulnerable communities contain some of Australia's most significant biodiversity values, including existing and proposed World Heritage sites (Wet Tropics and Cape York) wetlands of international significance (Gulf of Carpentaria) and places of significant marine and terrestrial diversity (e.g. Torres Strait). Past approaches to environmental management have predominantly focused on the biophysical dimensions of the problem however an equally important focus on building regional-scale community resilience is required if some of the worst impacts of climate change are to be avoided or mitigated. Government and community stakeholders need to know which actions, policies and arrangements build and support social resilience compared with those that do not. This paper outlines an emerging framework, indicators and method for information gathering and analysis to: (a) benchmark social resilience; (b) target the priority interventions required; and (c) measure progress arising from these interventions.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent418381 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWorld Planning Schools Congressen_US
dc.publisher.placePerth, Western Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://anzaps.net/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename2011 WPSCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleWorld Planning Schools Congress 2011: Planning in an era of uncertainty and transformationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-07-04en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-07-08en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationPerth, Western Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLand Use and Environmental Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120504en_US
dc.titleTowards more effective adaptive planning: Measuring and reporting social resilience in vulnerable coastal communities facing climate change in tropical Queenslanden_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 ANZAPS. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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