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dc.contributor.convenorAssociate Professor Paul Maginen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoiacetto, Eddoen_US
dc.contributor.authorDedekorkut, Aysinen_US
dc.contributor.authorHowes, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSipe, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.editorAssociate Professor Paul Maginen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T21:46:11Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T21:46:11Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-19T21:16:44Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.wpsc2011.com.au/index.htmlen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/45268
dc.description.abstractClimate change is a problem that requires action on many fronts. Society needs to both reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to impacts that cannot be avoided. Meeting such challenges requires a concerted effort by all sectors of society (government, business and the community) and this in turn places new demands on many professions. Planners will have a particularly important role to play and the challenge for educators is how to best provide graduates with the appropriate skills and knowledge. One of the key problems is how to integrate climate change into an already crowded professional curriculum. Should it be inserted as a topic in existing courses, should separate courses be created, or should a combination of these two approaches be adopted within a degree? What new skills and background knowledge will planners need? What is the best mode of delivery? This paper addresses these questions using examples from the Griffith School of Environment that has built up considerable experience in this area of professional education over several decades. The school offers a variety of degrees (in urban and environmental planning, architecture, environmental management and environmental science) and provides a useful perspective on the challenges faced by a broad range of professions across all sectors.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent176555 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWorld Planning Schools Congressen_US
dc.publisher.placePerth, Western Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://anzaps.net/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename2011 WPSCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleWorld Planning Schools Congress 2011: Planning in an era of uncertainty and transformationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-07-04en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-07-08en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationPerth, Western Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLand Use and Environmental Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120504en_US
dc.titleBroadening Horizons: Teaching planning students about climate change at the Griffith School of Environmenten_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 ANZAPS. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published versionen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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