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dc.contributor.authorPiquero, Alexen_US
dc.contributor.authorPiquero, Nicole Leeperen_US
dc.contributor.authorGertz, Marcen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorBatton, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:56:29Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:56:29Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-06-04T22:40:19Z
dc.identifier.issn00384941en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1540-6237.2011.00781.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/45466
dc.description.abstractObjective. The relationship between race and crime has been contentious, focusing primarily on offending and incarceration patterns among minorities. There has been some limited work on public perceptions of criminal punishment, and findings show that while minorities believe in the role and rule of law, they simultaneously perceive the justice system as acting in a biased and/or unfair manner. Two limitations have stalled this literature. First, research has focused mainly on criminal punishments to the neglect of noncriminal punishments. Second, most studies have not examined whether race remains salient after considering other demographic variables or discrimination and legitimacy attitudes. Methods. Using data from 400 adults, we examine how race affects perceptions of criminal punishment and subsequent reinstatement into the National Football League in the case of Michael Vick, a star professional quarterback who pled guilty to charges of operating an illegal dog-fighting ring. Results. Findings show that whites are more likely to view Vick's punishment as too soft and that he should not be reinstated, while nonwhites had the opposite views. Race remained significant after controlling for other variables believed to be related to punishment perceptions. Conclusion. Attitudes toward both criminal punishment and NFL reinstatement vary across race such that there exists important divides in how individuals perceive the system meting out punishment and subsequently reintegrating offenders back into society. These results underscore that white and nonwhites perceive the law and its administration differently.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Incen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom535en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto551en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial Science Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume92en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crimeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201en_US
dc.titleRace, Punishment, and the Michael Vick Experienceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governanceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author[s] for more information.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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