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dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diegoen_US
dc.contributor.authorHawgood, Jacintaen_US
dc.contributor.authorIde, Naokoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:30:34Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:30:34Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2012-09-04T23:24:41Z
dc.identifier.issn17585872en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1758-5872.2011.00174.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/45836
dc.description.abstractBackground: An increasing demand for physicians' involvement in life-ending decisions has led to extensive debate on euthanasia and right to die issues by social, political and medical groups. By definition, suicide prevention experts are considered to be pre-judgmentally biased on these aspects. However, their knowledge of the fields could actually make them important interlocutors in the debate. Aim: As a part of Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care's commission, an evaluation of the need for educating undergraduate medical students on suicide prevention, euthanasia and life-ending issues was performed. Methods: In Australia, semi-structured interviews were conducted on samples of medical schools coordinators, medical students, and general practitioners (GPs). Specifically, key academics in Curriculum and /or Accreditation Committees from 10 out of 15 Australian Medical Schools (AMS) participated in a survey on the possible implementation of suicide prevention, euthanasia and life-ending issues in undergraduate courses. University of Queensland medical students (n = 373) were asked to rate their attitude toward the same issues. Twenty four GPs from 6 different states (rural/urban environments) were asked to rate the level of importance of a specific curriculum on suicide prevention, euthanasia and life-ending issues. Results: Suicide prevention education was perceived of critical importance by all. Medical students showed high interest in learning about euthanasia and life-ending issues (76.8%), quality of life and quality of death (85.1%), and different types of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide (70%). They reported that physicians should be involved in ending-life decisions (89%). Forty per cent of AMS thought education on euthanasia and life-ending issues was essential. Fifty four per cent of GPs considered education in euthanasia and related issues as a high priority. Conclusions: The increasing aging population and the high prevalence of chronic illness call for a growing involvement of physicians in this difficult area of medical practice. Globally, the need for undergraduate education on these matters is perceived as important and urgent.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent205786 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto19en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAsia-Pacific Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714en_US
dc.titleDo we need education on right-to-die issues? Medical perspectives from Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, Australian Institute for Suicide Research & Preventionen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Do we need education on right-to-die issues? Medical Perspectives from Australia, Asia Pacific Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 4(1), 2012, pp. 10-19, which has been published in final form at dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1758-5872.2011.00174.x.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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