Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRaybould, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkins, Hughen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:10:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:10:42Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-09-25T04:40:27Z
dc.identifier.issn09596119en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09596110510591891en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4584
dc.description.abstractPurpose - This paper sets out to report on research that investigated hospitality managers' expectations of graduate skills and compared those expectations with student perceptions of what hospitality managers value. Design/methodology/approach - The research adopted a generic skills framework and data were collected through a sample survey of 850 Australian hospitality managers and 211 undergraduate hospitality management students. Findings - Managers rated skills associated with interpersonal, problem solving, and self-management skill domains as most important while students appeared to have realistic perceptions of the skills that managers value when recruiting hospitality graduates. The most substantial areas of disagreement came in those skills associated with the conceptual and analytical domain. Industry managers tended to discount the skills in this domain relative to students. Research limitations/implications - The sample of managers used in this study were predominantly of Australian nationality and, in an increasingly global hospitality labor market, there may be some benefit in repeating this study with managers from different cultural backgrounds. Practical implications - A number of strategies are proposed in the paper for bridging the expectation gaps and ensuring better learning outcomes for students and industry stakeholders. Originality/value - In adopting the generic skills framework this research presents an alternative to previous studies that have used a management competencies framework. As such, it is of more immediate value to those responsible for designing undergraduate hospitality management curriculum who need to ensure that programs meet academic standards as well as industry and student expectations regarding the skill sets needed in the workplace.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEmerald Publishing Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeBradford, UKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/0959-6119.htmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom203en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto216en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330204en_US
dc.titleOver qualified and under experienced - Turning graduates into hospitality managersen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Managementen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record