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dc.contributor.authorHerington, Carmelen_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, Donen_US
dc.contributor.authorW. Johnson, Lesteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:31:46Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:31:46Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-01-12T06:22:15Z
dc.identifier.issn13522752en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/13522750510603334en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4586
dc.description.abstractPurpose - To present the results of exploratory research which analysed firm-employee relationship strength from the employee perspective. Three main research questions were explored: What indicators should be used to measure strong firm-employee relationships? How important do employees see relationships to be in the work environment? and how do employees define relationship strength? Design/methodology/approach - Qualitative research in the form of focus groups was utilised. Four focus groups of employees from medium to large regional and national Australian companies were held in a large Australian regional city. Findings - Employees view relationships as being very important in the work environment. The findings revealed a greater degree of consistency between employees' viewpoints about important relationship elements and non-marketing literature. Important elements found were co-operation, empowerment, communication, attachment, shared goals and values, trust and respect. The emphasis on commitment as a key relationship indicator was not supported by the findings. The findings are summarised in a proposed model of relationship strength, positing commitment as a relationship strength outcome. Employees defined relationship strength in terms of the identified elements. Research limitations/implications - This research enables commencement of examination of the value of internal relationships through empirical examination of the proposed model. Practical implications - Management is informed as to what makes the best work environment from the perspective of employees. Originality/value - Fulfills an identified gap in the literature in relation to the ability to measure internal firm relationships. It also clarifies the confusing literature on relationship elements, and it posits a model for the empirical assessment of firm-employee relationship strength.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden_US
dc.publisher.placeBradford, Englanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/ViewContentServlet?Filename=Published/EmeraldFullTextArticle/Articles/2160080302.htmlen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom256en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto276en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQualitative Market Research: an international journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350204en_US
dc.titleFocus group exploration of firm-employee relationship strengthen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Marketingen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 Emerald: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher version for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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