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dc.contributor.authorKnight, Nicholasen_US
dc.contributor.editorTak-Wing Ngoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:14:38Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:14:38Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2007-04-02T05:18:02Z
dc.identifier.issn0920203Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4603
dc.description.abstractUntil 1921, the texts on Marxism to reach the Chinese Communist movement were dominated by an economic determinist interpretation of the materialist conception of history. Many Chinese converts to Marxism considered that belief in 'orthodox' Marxism necessitated belief in its economic determinism. In 1921, with the publication in China of the famous Dutch Marxist Herman Gorter's An Explanation of the Materialist Conception of History, it became evident that there were alternatives to economic determinism that could also claim to be "orthodox" Marxism. Gorter's flexible and multifaceted perspective on Marxism allowed that many factors can influence "historical evolution," and that they can interact in ways specific to particular historical contexts. Gorter emphasised the political and ideological struggles of the working class as central to the success of revolution. He nevertheless insisted, following Engels, that the economic factor was ultimately dominant. Gorter's ideas were well received by Chinese Marxists, particularly his Chinese translator Li Da, who amplified the influence of Gorter's Marxism in his own prolific essays on the materialist conception of history. It is possible that Mao Zedong was influenced by Gorter's ideas, either directly or indirectly via the writings of Li Da, and the evidence for this is evaluated.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://cin.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/19/3/381en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom381en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto412en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChina Informationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode430101en_US
dc.titleHerman Gorter and the origins of Marxism in Chinaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2005 Sage Publications. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in China Information. This journal is available online: http://cin.sagepub.com/content/vol19/issue3/en_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorKnight, Nicholas J.


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