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dc.contributor.authorLi, Guoxing
dc.contributor.authorSun, Jing
dc.contributor.authorJayasinghe, Satyajit
dc.contributor.authorPan, Xiao Chuan
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Maigeng
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xuying
dc.contributor.authorCai, Yue
dc.contributor.authorSadler, Ross
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Glendon
dc.contributor.editorCharles Duke
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:17:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:17:53Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-02-13T23:57:26Z
dc.identifier.issn21677263
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46110
dc.description.abstractAbstract The interactive effect between temperature and ambient particulate matter on mortality has attracted attention world-wide, but the results of studies investigating this interaction have been inconsistent. This comparative study aims to further clarify this important public health issue. The present study used two separate time-series analyses to explore whether the mean temperature modified the impact of ambient particulate matter of less than 10 孠in diameter (PM10) on daily non-accidental mortality in Beijing, China (2005-2009) and Brisbane, Australia (2004-2007). A bivariate response model and a stratification parametric model were used. The results show statistically significant interactive effects between PM10 and temperature on non-accidental mortality at various time lags. PM10 had a greater adverse effect on non-accidental mortality from cardiovascular disease on high temperature days. The interactive term coefficients per interquartile range increase in PM10 concentration and in high temperature levels were 1.95% (0.08%, 3.83%) in Brisbane, Australia on the current day and 0.25% (0.05%, 0.45%) in Beijing, China 2 days before the current day. The implications of this result indicate that it is important to reduce the emission of air particles on high temperature days in both cities, especially in Brisbane, Australia. Keywords Particulate Matter, Temperature, Non-Accidental Mortality
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent756416 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherScience and Academic Publishing
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.publisher.urihttp://article.sapub.org/10.5923.j.ijpbs.20120201.06.html
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom21
dc.relation.ispartofpageto27
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPublic Health Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEpidemiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111706
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleTemperature modifies the effects of particulate matter on non-accidental mortality: a comparative study of Beijing, China and Brisbane, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Scientific & Academic Publishing. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorShaw, Glendon R.
gro.griffith.authorSadler, Ross F.
gro.griffith.authorSun, Jing
gro.griffith.authorJayasinghe, Satyajit R.
gro.griffith.authorPan, Xiao Chuan C.


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