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dc.contributor.authorCronin, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Roden_US
dc.contributor.authorCarty, Chrisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:05:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:05:36Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-08T23:46:21Z
dc.identifier.issn87507587en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/japplphysiol.01402.2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46112
dc.description.abstractHuman movement requires an ongoing, finely tuned interaction between muscular and tendinous tissues, so changes in the properties of either tissue could have important functional consequences. One condition that alters the functional demands placed on lower limb muscle-tendon units is the use of high-heeled shoes (HH), which force the foot into a plantarflexed position. Long-term HH use has been found to shorten medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles and increase Achilles tendon stiffness, but the consequences of these changes for locomotor muscle-tendon function are unknown. This study examined the effects of habitual HH use on the neuromechanical behavior of triceps surae muscles during walking. The study population consisted of 9 habitual high heel wearers who had worn shoes with a minimum heel height of 5 cm at least 40 h/wk for a minimum of 2 yr, and 10 control participants who habitually wore heels for less than 10 h/wk. Participants walked at a self-selected speed over level ground while ground reaction forces, ankle and knee joint kinematics, lower limb muscle activity, and gastrocnemius fascicle length data were acquired. In long-term HH wearers, walking in HH resulted in substantial increases in muscle fascicle strains and muscle activation during the stance phase compared with barefoot walking. The results suggest that long-term high heel use may compromise muscle efficiency in walking and are consistent with reports that HH wearers often experience discomfort and muscle fatigue. Long-term HH use may also increase the risk of strain injuries.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1054en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1058en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Applied Physiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume112en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110601en_US
dc.titleLong-term use of high-heeled shoes alters the neuromechanics of human walkingen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author[s] for more information.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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