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dc.contributor.authorWeller, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.editorJohn Wanna and Patrick Bishopen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:27:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:27:19Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2007-03-19T21:44:16Z
dc.identifier.issn03136647en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8500.2005.00414.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4614
dc.description.abstractPolitical science is, we are led to believe, the study of power. Cabinet and the executive appear to be the epitome of national authority, but not of analysis. In Australia by contrast it seems that the study of power has not focussed on federal power, or at least power at the centre of national government. If the remit is to explore that centre - the prime minister, cabinet, ministers, the senior officials and the departments that coordinate the activities of government - then over the last few decades, the cupboard is somewhat bare. It is not that nothing has been written; rather it is that little has been done by the academic community and especially by political science profession in an area that at first sight should have been of direct interest to them. My concern here is not whether the history of the period has been told, but whether there has been an analysis of the forms, institutions and conventions through and by which political power is exercised at the centre of government. That may be a narrow definition, but related topics such as: departments, federalism and public management are being covered by others in this assessment of current research.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8500.2005.00414.xen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom35en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto42en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Public Administrationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume64en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360101en_US
dc.titleInvestigation Power at the Centre of Government: Surveying research on the Australian Executive.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 Blackwell Publishing. The definitive version is available at [www.blackwell-synergy.com.]en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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