Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGattuso, Suzyen_US
dc.contributor.authorFullagar, Simoneen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Ilenaen_US
dc.contributor.editorE. Annandaleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:40:08Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:40:08Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-18T05:34:57Z
dc.identifier.issn02779536en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.03.020en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4636
dc.description.abstractIn this article we examine the tensions between current Australian depression policy directions and lay beliefs about depression as constructed and circulated through popular media, at a time when mental health education discourses promoting 'depression literacy' (Parslow & Jorm, 2002) are widening the boundaries of what is understood to be depression. Drawing upon research into articles on depression published in two women's magazines before and after the promulgation of the National Action Plan for Depression, we identify the cultural context of certain lay beliefs about depression as articulated through personal and celebrity stories, advice columns and resource links. The depression literacy literature privileges biomedical and psychological expertise in explaining depression and promoting help-seeking behaviour. In contrast, the magazine discourses foreground an individualising discourse of depression as a problem of self-management. They emphasise women's abilities to manage difficult life events and to build informal supportive relationships, which reinforces dominant notions of feminine identity as concerned with balancing competing demands and roles. We critique the national policy on depression literacy as taking insufficient account of women's belief structures, which leads, for example, to a limited analysis of stigma. We also critique policy for not engaging sufficiently with the gendered nature of depression and its relation to social inequities, something the magazines replicate.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent86752 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier, Pergamonen_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#descriptionen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1640en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1648en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial Science and Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume61en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370403en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321204en_US
dc.titleSpeaking of women's 'nameless misery': The everyday construction of depression in Australian women's magazinesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record