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dc.contributor.convenorUrban Water Security Research Allianceen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeal, Caraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMakki, Anasen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Rodneyen_US
dc.contributor.editorBegbie, D.K., Kenway, S.J., Biermann, S.M. and Wakem, S.L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:25:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:25:04Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-07T06:02:21Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46538
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the South East Queensland Residential End Use Study (SEQREUS) was to address the research gap on water end usage by way of generating a high resolution data registry of water end uses and using such a database to explore the relationships and influences of residential water consumption from a bottom up approach. Such data can be used to optimise future demand management strategies. Mains water end uses in a sample of 252 residential dwellings located within South East Queensland (SEQ) were measured using a combination of high resolution smart meters and data loggers and a parallel social survey design comprising a questionnaire, a stock (appliance) audit and self-reported water diary for each household. An array of detailed analyses were conducted from the subsequent data registry based on three separate two-week monitoring periods (2 x winter and 1 x summer). Impacts on water consumption from water-efficient technology (eg, star rated washing machines, flow regulated taps and showers), socio-demographics (household composition, income and education and perceptions and attitudes towards of water conservation on household, per capita, diurnal and peak demand water consumption are presented, including the variation in water end uses on a daily and seasonal basis. We conclude with some policy considerations that evolved from our data analysis and that may assist in optimising future demand management strategies. For example, it is recommended to target households with large families with young children or teenagers, as these homes are often associated with high shower and tap usage.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent457542 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUrban Water Security Research Allianceen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.urbanwateralliance.org.au/publications/forum2012/index.html#presentationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameScience Forum and Stakeholder Engagement: Building Linkages, Collaboration and Science Qualityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleScience Forum and Stakeholder Engagement: Building Linkages, Collaboration and Science Qualityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2012-06-19en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2012-06-20en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchWater Resources Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090509en_US
dc.titleIdentifying the drivers of water consumption: A summary of results from the South East Queensland residential end use studyen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Urban Water Security Research Alliance. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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