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dc.contributor.convenorDr Huang Jianen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.editorHuang Jian, Liu Deen, Ma Songge Peng Siminen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:22:12Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:22:12Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-27T12:22:07Z
dc.identifier.refurirwlecnu.org/en-us/Home.aspxen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46584
dc.description.abstractContemporary adult and vocational learning theories acknowledge the social and collective nature of learning. Throughout this body of literature numerous terms conceptualise and articulate the fact of individuals' learning as engagement in joint activity with others, with contextual systems and artefacts and with socio-historic knowledge. These terms include; communities of practice, co-participation, networks and knotworks, collaboration, experience, interaction, relational interdependence, co-configuration and negotiation. This paper focuses on the term 'negotiation' and its capacities to conceptualise a social theory of personal learning. The paper proposes that 'negotiation' is under theorised in the dominantly socio-cultural constructivist literature on work-based learning that uses the concept to illuminate something of the relationship between the individual and the social and the interactive processes that characterise workers' situated participative practices. Further, the paper proposes that overcoming some of this under theorisation can be achieved by understanding negotiation as constituting four primary interactive forms of joint activity that workers are engaged in through the enactment of their work. Those forms are referred to as realised, discovered, concealed and protracted negotiations. The case is advanced by drawing on the findings of a qualitative research project that examined the personal work practices of twelve individual workers from four different workplaces. This research indicates that workers can be viewed as negotiating their participation in work and that negotiation can be used as a metaphor to conceptualise personal learning practices as social processes of engagement in activity when the four forms of negotiation are used to analyse and categorise workers personal practices.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherEast China Normal Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.rwlecnu.org/en-us/Home.aspxen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename7th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL7 2011)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of 7th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL7 2011)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2011-12-04en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2011-12-07en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationShanghai, Chinaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.titlePersonal Work and Learning Practices: Four Forms of Negotiationen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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