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dc.contributor.authorHossain, Jahangiren_US
dc.contributor.authorR. Pota, Hemanshuen_US
dc.contributor.authorMahmud, Apelen_US
dc.contributor.authorA. Ramos, Rodrigoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:07:15Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:07:15Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-05-30T03:46:30Z
dc.identifier.issn19328184en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/JSYST.2011.2162991en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46741
dc.description.abstractThe complexity of power systems has increased in recent years due to the operation of existing transmission lines closer to their limits, using flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) devices, and also due to the increased penetration of new types of generators that have more intermittent characteristics and lower inertial response, such as wind generators. This changing nature of a power system has considerable effect on its dynamic behaviors resulting in power swings, dynamic interactions between different power system devices, and less synchronized coupling. This paper presents some analyses of this changing nature of power systems and their dynamic behaviors to identify critical issues that limit the large-scale integration of wind generators and FACTS devices. In addition, this paper addresses some general concerns toward high compensations in different grid topologies. The studies in this paper are conducted on the New England and New York power system model under both small and large disturbances. From the analyses, it can be concluded that high compensation can reduce the security limits under certain operating conditions, and the modes related to operating slip and shaft stiffness are critical as they may limit the large-scale integration of wind generation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent159948 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherIEEEen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom76en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto84en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalIEEE Systems Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchRenewable Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl. Solar Cells)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090608en_US
dc.titleInvestigation of the Impacts of Large-Scale Wind Power Penetration on the Angle and Voltage Stability of Power Systemsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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