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dc.contributor.authorBosman, Caryl
dc.contributor.editorAndrea Gaynor, Elizabeth Gralton, Jenny Gregory & Sarah McQuade
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:11:47Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:11:47Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2012-09-17T22:32:27Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://uhphg.com/biennial-conferences/perth-2012/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46746
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on the influence that baby boomer lifestyle preferences have had and are having on the production of the Australian Dream of home ownership in suburbia. It will look in particular at the phenomenon of Master Planned Communities (MPCs) and the recent mutation of this entity: the Active Adult Lifestyle Community (AALC). The planning techniques and practices of both these residential landscapes are linked to specific ideals of community and understandings of the good life. As such, these types of development reinforce and reproduce the Australian Dream idyll. This 'dream' has remained influential over the boomers' life-course. The aim of the paper is to trace some of the transformations in Australian suburban housing landscapes as they relate to the baby boomer cohorts. This historical mapping illustrates some of the impacts and implications that this generational cohort has had and is having in transforming and informing Australia's housing landscapes and the lived experiences these landscapes produce. The paper agues that the Australian Dream of homeownership in suburbia has remained largely unaltered over the last 50 to 60 years. However the housing landscapes that this 'dream' has inspired have transformed over the years to reflect the dominant political environment of the time and place. Understanding the histories of boomer housing landscapes is critical if future housing landscapes are to be viable, equitable and liveable, especially given current debates about climate change, an ageing population, social polarisation and social isolation
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent235733 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAUHPHG
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://uhphg.com/biennial-conferences/perth-2012/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename11th Australasian Urban History/Planning History Conference
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleUrban Transformations: Booms, Busts and other Catastrophes
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2012-02-06
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2012-02-08
dc.relation.ispartoflocationPerth, Western Australia
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Theory of the Built Environment (excl. Architecture)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120502
dc.titleChanging housing landscapes: How baby boomers are implicit in urban transformations
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2012. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the author.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBosman, Caryl J.


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