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dc.contributor.authorLo, Alex
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:05:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:05:19Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2012-09-10T23:24:12Z
dc.identifier.issn10353046
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46757
dc.description.abstractThe Australian Government has produced a CO2-equivalent tax proposal with a difference: it is a short prelude to an emission trading scheme that will allow the increasing rate of emissions to continue, while being a net cost to the Treasury. That cost extends to allowing major emitters to make guaranteed windfall profits from pollution permits. The emission trading scheme suffers numerous problems, but the issues raised in this article show that taxes can also be watered down and made ineffectual through concessions. Taxpayers will get no assets from the billions of dollars to be spent buying-off the coal generators or other polluters. The scheme seeks to stimulate private investors to create an additional 12 per cent in renewable electricity generation by 2020. A really serious emissions reducing alternative would need to create a nationalised electricity sector with 100 per cent renewable energy within a decade. We explore the limitations of Australia's carbon tax plan which has now passed into law.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent187505 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Wales
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.asb.unsw.edu.au/research/publications/economiclabourrelationsreview/pages/default.aspx
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom67
dc.relation.ispartofpageto86
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Economic and Labour Relations Review
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironment and Resource Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode140205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1402
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.titleAustralia’s Carbon Tax: A Sheep in Wolf’s Clothing?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 UNSW. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLo, Alex


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