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dc.contributor.authorHermoso, Virgilio
dc.contributor.authorPantus, Francis
dc.contributor.authorOlley, Jon
dc.contributor.authorLinke, Simon
dc.contributor.authorMugodo, James
dc.contributor.authorLea, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:39:32Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:39:32Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-01-15T00:38:44Z
dc.identifier.issn0046-5070
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2427.2011.02693.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46918
dc.description.abstract1. Owing to intensive human use, freshwaters are among the most seriously threatened and modified environments on the planet. Their poor condition and the risk to services that humans need from these ecosystems make their rehabilitation a priority. However, many previous studies have reported the poor performance of many rehabilitation activities. 2. Here, we analyse reasons for this poor performance, focussing on the planning of rehabilitation activities, and propose a new approach. We argue that the failure to include driving factors at a scale adequate to capture the ecological processes involved, together with an insufficient incorporation of socio-economic aspects, is a key factor leading the poor performance of many rehabilitation activities. 3. We propose a new approach, 'systematic rehabilitation planning', that brings together advances made in conservation planning (cost-effectiveness analysis) and ecosystem science (understanding the complexity of ecosystem processes). This enables planning to be done at the catchment scale, and the trade-offs between various rehabilitation actions to be integrated and prioritised. 4. Finally, it is important, given the constraints imposed by a lack of knowledge, that the planning process is part of an adaptive cycle where it can benefit from and consolidate the experience gained during the implementation and monitoring stages.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent196399 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFreshwater Biology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.titleSystematic planning for river rehabilitation: integrating multiple ecological and economic objectives in complex decisions
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Blackwell Publishing. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Systematic planning for river rehabilitation: integratingmultiple ecological and economic objectives in complexdecisions, Freshwater Biology, Vol. 57(1), 2012, pp. 1-9, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2427.2011.02693.x.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorOlley, Jon M.
gro.griffith.authorPantus, Francis
gro.griffith.authorLinke, Simon
gro.griffith.authorHermoso, Virgilio


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