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dc.contributor.authorSveticic, Jernejaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diegoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:39:08Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:39:08Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-05-30T01:47:55Z
dc.identifier.issn01638343en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2011.10.009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46931
dc.description.abstractObjective: Most people who die by suicide never seek help, particularly members of ethnic minorities. This study compared the prevalence of contacts with mental health services, types of services accessed and factors related to help-seeking behaviors by Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians. Method: All suicides by Indigenous and non-Indigenous persons from Queensland, Australia, during the period 1994-2007 were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression models. Results: Non-Indigenous suicide cases were almost two times more likely than Indigenous counterparts to have ever received help for mental health problems (43.3% vs. 23.8%). The most common source of help for Indigenous persons was inpatient care, while for non-Indigenous persons, it was general practitioners. Factors increasing the likelihood of service utilization by Indigenous persons were suicide attempt in last year, living in metropolitan area and not being married. Among non-Indigenous persons, these factors were recent communication of suicidal intent or suicide attempt, recent treatment for physical illness and problematic consumption of alcohol. Conclusions: Indigenous Australians die by suicide at a rate twice higher than the non-Indigenous population, yet they are significantly less likely to seek professional help for mental health concerns. Help-seeking behavior among Indigenous Australians at risk of suicide should be promoted thorough provision of culturally appropriate services. 頲011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Suicide; Indigenous populations; Help-seeking; Mental health servicesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent439913 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom185en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto191en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111701en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714en_US
dc.titleContacts with mental health services before suicide: a comparison of Indigenous with non-Indigenous Australiansen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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