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dc.contributor.authorMorrison0987657, ClareDNUen_US
dc.contributor.authorRounds, Isaacen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatling, Dicken_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:18:12Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:18:12Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-27T00:27:32Z
dc.identifier.issn0364152Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00267-012-9836-3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/46942
dc.description.abstractRecovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This articlesummarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourismindustry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent923627 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom929en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto941en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironmental Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume49en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchImpacts of Tourismen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchConservation and Biodiversityen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150601en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050202en_US
dc.titleConservation and Management of the Endangered Fiji Sago Palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fijien_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Springer New York. This is an electronic version of an article published in Environmental Management, May 2012, Volume 49, Issue 5, pp 929-941. Environmental Management is available online at: http://www.springerlink.com/ with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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