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dc.contributor.authorWigblad, Runeen_US
dc.contributor.authorHannson, Magnusen_US
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Keithen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewer, Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:02:17Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:02:17Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-03T00:27:35Z
dc.identifier.issn00483486en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/00483481211200015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47088
dc.description.abstractPurpose - This paper aims to explore and analyse how shifting frontiers of control emerge and change the labour process so that restrictions to output become diminished, subsequently affecting organisational performance. Design/methodology/approach - Multiple case study design. Interviews with 104 respondents. Analysis of productivity statistics in order to test for the statistical significance of the closedown effect. Single multiple regression analysis of the comparative strength, of the closedown effect, between cases. Findings - Shifting frontiers of control arise during the closedown process, a control system characterised by markedly unrestricted autonomy for the workers as the management frontiers of control abate. This provides an operative space for informal work practices, innovation and emerging new industrial relations, accounting for the higher levels of output. Research limitations/implications - A multiple case study of three different manufacturing organisations, with comparably long closedown periods. The authors do not analyse the sustainability of the increase in output or the generalisibility of the closedown effect to other industries. Practical implications - It is possible to anticipate improved productivity if shifting frontiers of control are rapidly replacing the old. If management abandons the old control mechanisms, previous to the closedown decision, and provides operative space for workers' initiatives and informal leadership during the closedown process, it is possible to expect good performance, enabling a scope for extended closedown periods. Originality/value - This is the first study that analyses the comparative strength of the closedown effect and how restricted work practices change under the process of closedown.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEmeralden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom160en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto179en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPersonnel Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume41en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150306en_US
dc.titleShifting frontiers of control during closedown processesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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