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dc.contributor.authorCooke, Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Bernadetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlacklock, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorMansah, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Matyldaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTower, Marionen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurfield, Jennyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:45:14Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:45:14Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-03T01:20:16Z
dc.identifier.issn08130531en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47133
dc.description.abstractObjectives This exploratory evaluation sought to examine students' experiences of receiving lectures via a web-based digital lecture technology, Lecture Capture. Design A descriptive, online survey undertaken during weeks 8-10 of semester one in May, 2010. Setting An Australian University in Brisbane, South-East Queensland. Subjects 128 first-year students enrolled in a Bachelor of Nursing Program. Main outcome measure Student experiences of Lecture Capture measured by a 14-item survey developed for the evaluation. Results Students largely perceived Lecture Capture to be useful in aiding understanding and learning, both during the course and in preparation for assessment. It particularly helped the two older groups of students (22-30 & >30 years) understand lectures and revise content at their own pace. Lecture Capture assisted first-year students in adjusting to university life, and this was most noticeable for the youngest group of respondents (<19 years). On-line lectures helped students become familiar with the program's websites and web resources and provided an opportunity to practice note-taking. With the exception of those aged 22-30, Lecture Capture was not regarded as a more effective use of time than face-to-face lectures. Predominantly, students would have preferred face-to-face lectures with optional Lecture Capture, and this was strongest amongst the two older groups. Students overwhelming noted satisfaction when live lectures became available from week four. Conclusions Findings support the use of web-based digital lecture technology during the initial weeks of university for first-year Bachelor of Nursing students, but indicate this should be to supplement, rather than replace, traditional face-to-face lectures.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent440160 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Nursing Federationen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.ajan.com.au/Vol29/29-3.pdf#page=15en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom14en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto21en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Advanced Nursingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume29en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111099en_US
dc.titleLecture Capture: first year student nurses’ experiences of a web‑based lecture technologyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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