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dc.contributor.authorBradley, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Kerryen_US
dc.contributor.authorLingard, Helenen_US
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Keithen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T18:36:41Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T18:36:41Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-03T01:17:42Z
dc.identifier.issn07339364en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1061/(ASCE)CO.1943-7862.0000436en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47158
dc.description.abstractThis paper extends the understanding of working-time changes and work-life balance (WLB) through analyzing a case study where a reduction in working hours designed to assist the workforce in balancing work and nonwork life was implemented. An alliance project in the Australian construction industry was established initially with a 5-day working week, a departure from the industry-standard 6-day week. However, a range of factors complicated the success of this initiative, and the industry-standard 6-day working week was reinstated for the project. The authors argue that this case is valuable in determining the complex mix of influences that work against a wholesale or straightforward adoption of working-time adjustments and work-life balance practices. It is concluded that although the prevailing workplace culture is considered an important factor in the determination of working time, structural and workplace principles and practices may also be critical in working to secure the successful introduction of working-time reduction and work-life balance initiatives in the construction industry in the future.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent156324 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineersen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom443en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto448en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Construction Engineering and Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume138en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150306en_US
dc.titleComplicated Working Time Arrangements: Construction Industry Case Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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