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dc.contributor.authorRogers, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorCreed, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorSearle, Judithen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:29:25Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:29:25Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-04T02:31:23Z
dc.identifier.issn01565788en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/AH11999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47209
dc.description.abstractbjective. To identify the reasons why interns would not choose a surgical career. Methods. This qualitative study used semi-structured telephone interviews to explore the future career choices of 41 junior doctors (14 men, 27 women). Doctors were asked to identify specialties they would not take up, and state why this was the case. Results. Thirty (73.2%) of the 41 interns nominated surgery as a specialty they would not choose. Themes relating to reasons for not wanting to pursue a surgical career included the lifestyle associated with surgery (66.7%), the culture within the surgical work environment (53.3%), the lack of interest in performing surgical work (36.7%), and the training requirements associated with surgery (33.3%). Both sexes had similar reasons for not wanting to choose a surgical career; but additionally, women referred to the male domination of surgery, and the difficulty and inflexibility of the training program as deterrents. Conclusions. Efforts are needed to promote interest in surgery as a career especially for women, to improve the surgical work environment so that medical students and junior doctors have exposure to positive role models and surgical placements, and to provide a more flexible approach to surgical training. What is known about the topic? In Australia, there is an anticipated future shortage of surgeons, with acute shortages expected in some locations. Lifestyle issues are reported as the primary contributing factor. What does this paper add? Little is known about Australian junior doctors' perceptions of surgery as a possible specialty choice. The results of this qualitative study reveal that perceived lack of lifestyle, the culture within the surgical environment, the lack of interest in performing surgery, and concerns relating to the training program were the main disincentives to choosing a surgical career. These results add to the international literature in this area. What are the implications for practitioners? To meet current and future workforce needs, educators need to be aware that positive role models and positive work environments are very important in attracting more medical students and graduates to choosing surgery as a career.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent116717 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom191en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto196en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Health Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume36en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial and Organisational Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170107en_US
dc.titleWhy are junior doctors deterred from choosing a surgical career?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 AHHA. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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