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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorK. Eaglesham, Geoffreyen_US
dc.contributor.authorB. McGregor, Glennen_US
dc.contributor.authorChong, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.authorA. Seawright, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorA. Wickramasinghe, Wasanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSadler, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Lindsayen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Glennen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:17:11Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:17:11Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-09-24T04:59:03Z
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph9072412en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47223
dc.description.abstractFish collected after a mass mortality at an artificial lake in south-east Queensland, Australia, were examined for the presence of nodularin as the lake had earlier been affected by a Nodularia bloom. Methanol extracts of muscle, liver, peritoneal and stomach contents were analysed by HPLC and tandem mass spectrometry; histological examination was conducted on livers from captured mullet. Livers of sea mullet (Mugil cephalus) involved in the fish kill contained high concentrations of nodularin (median 43.6 mg/kg, range 40.8-47.8 mg/kg dry weight; n = 3) and the toxin was also present in muscle tissue (median 44.0 姯kg, range 32.3-56.8 姯kg dry weight). Livers of fish occupying higher trophic levels accumulated much lower concentrations. Mullet captured from the lake 10 months later were also found to have high hepatic nodularin levels. DNA sequencing of mullet specimens revealed two species inhabiting the study lake: M. cephalus and an unidentified mugilid. The two mullet species appear to differ in their exposure and/or uptake of nodularin, with M. cephalus demonstrating higher tissue concentrations. The feeding ecology of mullet would appear to explain the unusual capacity of these fish to concentrate nodularin in their livers; these findings may have public health implications for mullet fisheries and aquaculture production where toxic cyanobacteria blooms affect source waters. This report incorporates a systematic review of the literature on nodularin measured in edible fish, shellfish and crustaceans.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent437267 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2412en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2443en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Impact Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050204en_US
dc.titleFirst Report of a Toxic Nodularia spumigena (Nostocales/ Cyanobacteria) Bloom in Sub-Tropical Australia. II. Bioaccumulation of Nodularin in Isolated Populations of Mullet (Mugilidae)en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Healthen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, author. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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