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dc.contributor.authorGreen, Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Meganen_US
dc.contributor.authorShum, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Suzanneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:35:18Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:35:18Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T22:15:31Z
dc.identifier.issn09629343en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11136-012-0204-9en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47240
dc.description.abstractPurpose. This study applied the Social Cognitive Processing (SCP) model to examine whether positive (social support) and negative (social constraints) aspects of the social environment influenced emotional distress, quality of life (QoL), wellbeing and benefit finding after cancer. Methods. Participants were 439 adults at a median of 66 weeks post-diagnosis and 79% of them had completed cancer treatments. Outcome measures and predictors were assessed twice, 6 months apart, and their relationships were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regressions. Results. Participants reported improved physical QoL at re-test. Correlations showed that better outcomes for depression, anxiety, QoL, and wellbeing were associated with higher social support and lower social constraints. In addition, benefit finding correlated with social support but not social constraints. After other predictors were taken into account, lower initial social constraints were modestly associated with improved mental QoL at re-test. Higher social constraints scores also predicted development of clinically significant depression and anxiety. Conclusions. Results provided some support for the SCP model's prediction that both positive and negative aspects of social environment can contribute to adjustment in people with cancer. Although several findings supported the model, a heterogeneous sample and small effect sizes indicate that replication and further study is needed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent152267 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom759en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto770en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQuality of Life Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth, Clinical and Counselling Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170106en_US
dc.titleProspective individual and social predictors of changes in adjustment for patients attending a regional cancer serviceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Springer. This is an electronic version of an article published in Quality of Life Research, May 2013, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 759-770. Quality of Life Research is available online at: http://link.springer.com// with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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