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dc.contributor.authorNeumann, MM
dc.contributor.authorNeumann, DL
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:21:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:21:24Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-08-29T22:17:48Z
dc.identifier.issn0009-4056
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00094056.2012.643712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47260
dc.description.abstractPsycholinguistics coined the term idiomorph to describe idiosyncratic invented word-like units that toddlers use to refer to familiar objects during their early language development (Haslett & Samter, 1997; Otto, 2008; Reich, 1986; Scovel, 2004; Werner & Kaplan, 1963). Idiomorphs act as "words" because their meanings and phonetic pronunciations are stable and consistent (Haslett & Samter, 1997). Parents and family members often adopt idiomorphs, which can be intermingled with other words, to encourage their toddlers to communicate with them (Otto, 2008; Reich, 1986). As their language skills develop, children gradually replace the idiomorph with the correct verbal label for the object (Scovel, 2004). While young children have been reported to use idiomorphs in reference to objects, little has been written on how children use idiomorphs to refer to print. Recent research indicates that idiomorphs can play a role in early literacy development. This article summarizes research and provides practical examples using the observations of a young child. Speci? c examples show how parents and early childhood educators can use idiomorphs to develop a child's emergent literacy.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent168018 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom23
dc.relation.ispartofpageto29
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChildhood Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume88
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducational Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1301
dc.titleThe Role of Idiomorphs in Emergent Literacy
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studies
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Routledge, Taylor & Francis. This is an electronic version of an article published in Childhood Education, Volume 88, Issue 1, 2012, Pages 23-29. Childhood Education is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com with the open URL of your article.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorNeumann, David L.
gro.griffith.authorNeumann, Michelle M.


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