Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yu-Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorKellett, Ursulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSt John, Winsomeen_US
dc.contributor.editorRoger Watsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:23:16Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:23:16Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-03T23:53:38Z
dc.identifier.issn09621067en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03741.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47278
dc.description.abstractAims and objectives. This article explores the Chinese social context and provides insight into Taiwanese mothers' challenging experiences when a disabled child is born into their families. Background. International research indicates that barriers to maternal caregiving for a disabled child revolve around challenging relationships. Giving birth to a disabled child creates a huge challenge for mothers in Chinese society. Design. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and journaling methods. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach, informed by the philosophical world views of Heidegger and Gadamer, provided theoretical guidance in revealing and interpreting mothers' experiences. Method. Interviews were carried out with a purposeful sample of 15 mothers who were primary caregivers for a child aged between 0-18 years who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy and used Mandarin or Taiwanese as their primary language. Results. Shared meanings revealed four modes of being concerned: (1) experiencing burden as a sole primary caregiver; (2) managing the challenges by balancing demands; (3) being marginalised by others; and (4) encountering limited or no professional support. Conclusions. Taiwanese mothers face the strain of managing barriers to caregiving in contexts in which their children are not supported or acknowledged as being important contributors to family and Chinese society at large. This study highlights how the family can be important to caregiving mothers in traditional Chinese family life. Poor support and dynamics will emerge when family members regard disability as a loss of face or a stigma. Relevance to clinical practice. By learning from Taiwanese mothers who accommodate barriers to caregiving on a daily basis, nurses can seize the impetus to explore ways of reconceptualising nursing practice with families and people with disabilities. The aim is to explore ways that will ultimately align intentions and caring processes and foster coping and positive reward in caring, thereby creating a context that is stress reducing and therapeutic. Key words: cerebral palsy, family caregiving, mother, nurses, nursing, phenomenology, Taiwanen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent161474 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom189en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto197en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1-2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Clinical Nursingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Tertiary (Rehabilitative)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111004en_US
dc.titleBeing concerned: Caregiving for Taiwanese mothers of a child with cerebral palsyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record