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dc.contributor.authorGrace, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeaven, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorBodey, Kellien_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Mitchellen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeaven, Keithen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:55:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:55:24Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-03T05:09:50Z
dc.identifier.issn0191491Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.stueduc.2012.05.001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47307
dc.description.abstractAlthough not specifically designed for this purpose, the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) continues to be used as a proxy for student satisfaction. This may be due to a lack of appropriate alternative measures, or a clear understanding of the relationship between quality and satisfaction. This study, therefore, examines the CEQ dimensions (good teaching, clear goal setting, appropriate workload, appropriate assessment and generic skills development) in conjunction with a global student satisfaction measure (developed for this study). In addition, the constructs of interest are conceptualised into a pattern of relationships that delineates antecedent and outcome variables in order to examine relationships. Data were collected via survey instrument from a sample of 164 Australian students attending one third-year capstone course of a Bachelor degree in business. The results indicate that good teaching and clear goal setting have a direct influence on outcome variables (i.e., generic skills efficacy and overall satisfaction), whereas appropriate assessment and appropriate workload do not have a direct effect on the either of the outcome variables. However, the strongest influence in the hypothesised model was that exerted by generic skills efficacy on overall satisfaction. The structural model was further examined across male and female responses. While the male model replicated the findings of the overall model, the female model was quite different i.e., the antecedent variables directly influenced generic skills development but there was no direct influence on overall satisfaction.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent440661 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom35en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto43en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalStudies in Educational Evaluationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume38en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Assessment and Evaluationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130303en_US
dc.titlePutting student evaluations into perspective: The Course Experience Quality and Satisfaction Model (CEQS)en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Marketingen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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