Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSveticic, Jerneja
dc.contributor.authorToo, Lay San Tiffany
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diego
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T23:40:19Z
dc.date.available2017-08-10T23:40:19Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-06-17T02:40:55Z
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000607en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47534
dc.description.abstractObjective: A first study to compare suicides by missing persons with other suicide cases. Design: Retrospective cohort study for the period 1994–2007. Geographical location: Queensland, Australia. Population: 194 suicides by missing persons and 7545 other suicides were identified through the Queensland Suicide Register and the National Coroners Information System. Main outcome measure: χ2 statistics and binary logistic regression were used to identify distinct characteristics of suicides by missing persons. Results: Compared with other suicide cases, missing persons significantly more often died by motor vehicle exhaust gas toxicity (23.7% vs 16.4%; χ2=7.32, p<0.01), jumping from height (6.7% vs 3.2%; χ2=7.08, p<0.01) or drowning (8.2% vs 1.8%; χ2=39.53, p<0.01), but less frequently by hanging (29.4% vs 39.9%; χ2=8.82, p<0.01). They were most frequently located in natural outdoors locations (58.2% vs 11.1%; χ2=388.25, p<0.01). Persons gone missing were less likely to have lived alone at time of death (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.76), yet more likely to be institutionalised (OR 3.12, 95% CI 1.28 to 7.64). They were less likely to have been physically ill (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.95) or have a history of problematic consumptions of alcohol (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.87). In comparison to other suicide cases, missing persons more often communicated their suicidal intent prior to death (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.22). Conclusions: Suicides by missing persons show several distinct characteristics in comparisons to other suicides. The findings have implications for development of suicide prevention strategies focusing on early identification and interventions targeting this group. In particular, it may offer assistance to police in designing risk assessment procedures and subsequent investigations of missing persons. ;en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent161248 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome000607-1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe000607-8en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMJ Openen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714en_US
dc.titleSuicides by persons reported as missing prior to death: a retrospective cohort studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2012, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record