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dc.contributor.authorSomerset, Shawn
dc.contributor.authorBall, Richard
dc.contributor.authorFlett, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorGeissman, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:40:18Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:40:18Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.issn13229974
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4764
dc.description.abstractThe discipline of nutrition involves many complex relationships between humans and food. The changing food supply has affected our understanding of the origins of food and its role in our lives. Supermarket shopping and television advertising are examples of major influences on public perceptions of food origins. Although much less present in contemporary urban life, gardening also offers a vehicle to explore food origins firsthand. Previous research indicates that community gardening involves three major environmental influences on longevity: diet, physical activity and psychosocial fulfilment. Several evaluations at Brisbane's Northey Street City Farm indicate that community gardening can influence these environmental factors in disadvantaged groups such as the long term unemployed. School-based community gardens are not uncommon in Queensland. In a recent survey, 24% of primary schools in the Logan region of south-east Queensland reported having a functioning vegetable garden. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with teachers responsible for each of these gardens to develop an insight into their origins and functions. School-based community gardens represent a significant opportunity to embed nutrition, physical activity and environmental sustainability into mainstream curricula.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent941375 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHome Economics Institute of Australia Inc.
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.heia.com.au/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom25
dc.relation.ispartofpageto33
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnthropology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1111
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1601
dc.titleSchool-based community gardens: Re-establishing healthy relationships with food.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2005 Home Economics Institute of Australia. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2015-04-28T04:51:12Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSomerset, Shawn M.


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