Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMortimore, Annaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:03:40Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:03:40Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-07T05:57:34Z
dc.identifier.issn0812695Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47668
dc.description.abstractAustralia's Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) regime is not aligned with environmental policy objectives of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from road transport. Unfortunately, the reform announced by the Australian Government on 10 May 2011 to remove the incentive for people driving excess kilometres to reduce tax liability is unlikely to significantly cut road emissions. This is because the reform fails to address other behavioural effects harmful to the environment, that is, the concession will continue to increase the total number of vehicles acquired, and distort employees' choice of vehicle towards larger, more carbon emitting vehicles. To achieve a significant reduction in road transport emissions will require improving the fuel efficiency of conventional vehicles as well as a gradual transition from fossil fuels to alternative fuels, both of which will involve technological advancement in low carbon vehicles. However, to bring such technology to the market will require consumers to make a behavioural change by purchasing low emission vehicles, and this will require Government support so that consumers are guided towards making such low carbon choices. This paper argues that the existing car fringe benefits concession is an effective measure to encourage a behavioural change to low-emission vehicles, particularly as over half of all new vehicles acquired each year are fleet vehicles under the FBT regime. This would also significantly build up the country's fleet of low-emission vehicles, as vehicles under the FBT regime are sold onto the second hand market every two to three years. Given this, the paper considers what reform is necessary to the car FBT regime to encourage a behavioural change that would build up Australia's fleet of low emission vehicles and support the environmental policy objective of significantly reducing road transport emissions.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent801281 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTaxation Institute of Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.taxinstitute.com.au/australian-tax-forum/what-now-for-environmental-sustainability-government-fails-to-link-the-australian-car-fbt-concession-to-vehicle-emissionsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom541en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto583en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Tax Forumen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Monitoringen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTaxation Lawen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050206en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180125en_US
dc.titleWhat now for environmental sustainability? Government fails to link the Australian car FBT concession to vehicle emissionsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economicsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2012. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record