Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMenon, Sarasen_US
dc.contributor.authorLea, Rodneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Bishakhaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorWee, Shirleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaupt, Larisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Lynen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:55:24Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:55:24Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-14T00:57:00Z
dc.identifier.issn11292369en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10194-012-0468-zen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47674
dc.description.abstractMigraine is a painful and debilitating, neurovascular disease. Current migraine head pain treatments work with differing efficacies in migraineurs. The opioid system plays an important role in diverse biological functions including analgesia, drug response and pain reduction. The A118G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in exon 1 of the l-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) has been associated with elevated pain responses and decreased pain threshold in a variety of populations. The aim of the current preliminary study was to test whether genotypes of the OPRM1 A118G SNP are associated with head pain severity in a clinical cohort of female migraineurs. This was a preliminary study to determine whether genotypes of the OPRM1 A118G SNP are associated with head pain severity in a clinical cohort of female migraineurs. A total of 153 chronic migraine with aura sufferers were assessed for migraine head pain using the Migraine Disability Assessment Score instrument and classified into high and low pain severity groups. DNA was extracted and genotypes obtained for the A118G SNP. Logistic regression analysis adjusting for age effects showed the A118G SNP of the OPRM1 gene to be significantly associated with migraine pain severity in the test population (P = 0.0037). In particular, G118 allele carriers were more likely to be high pain sufferers compared to homozygous carriers of the A118 allele (OR = 3.125, 95 % CI = 1.41, 6.93, P = 0.0037). These findings suggest that A118G genotypes of the OPRM1 gene may influence migraineassociated head pain in females. Further investigations are required to fully understand the effect of this gene variant on migraine head pain including studies in males and in different migraine subtypes, as well as in response to head pain medication.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent250387 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeItalyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom513en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto519en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Headache and Painen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGenomicsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060408en_US
dc.titleThe human μ-opioid receptor gene polymorphism (A118G) is associated with head pain severity in a clinical cohort of female migraine with aura patientsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Scienceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2012. This is a SpringerOpen Access license agreement which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record