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dc.contributor.authorBeran, Royen_US
dc.contributor.authorDjekic, Sanjaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:20:25Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:20:25Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-18T00:33:48Z
dc.identifier.issn1752928Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jflm.2012.02.026en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47679
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The Council of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) considered it timely to survey its membership to determine how to best accommodate its members' needs. Methods: A questionnaire was devised, piloted and circulated amongst the 219 College members (excluding the 13 Honorary Fellows). Yield was maximised with 4 direct mailings, 4 questionnaire insertions in the quarterly College newsletter, 3 targeted emails and follow-up phone calls. Results: The survey achieved 160 (73%) response rate of whom w40% were substantially involved in legal and forensic medicine and w40% were occasionally involved. Thirty-five participants (23%) specialised in forensic medicine and 101 (63%) held Fellowship status in other recognised medical specialities. Equal 1/3 of the members had been so for >10 years, 5e10 years or <5 years, demonstrating the dynamic nature of the College. Of them 53% were Fellows, 26% Members and 21% Associates with 50% of the latter groups willing to train towards Fellowship. About half the respondents (48%) regularly attended the Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) and favoured the Eastern border for such meetings. The collegiate nature of the College was deemed its most positive aspect with a dichotomy of views regarding seeking alternative strand affiliation for specialist recognition, although 80% indicated they would retain College membership even if such affiliation occurred. Those who attended College educative programs found them useful but attendance was between 32 and 49%, depending on the course. Discussion: There appeared widespread satisfaction with College performance and activities but a low uptake of educative courses, other than Annual Scientific Meetings, thereby identifying marketing of courses as needing extra attention.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent233552 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom345en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto349en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Forensic and Legal Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.titleMembership survey of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine: Quality assuranceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medicineen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Elsevier B.V. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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