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dc.contributor.authorCherrier, Heleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.editorProf. Slawomir Magalaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:42:28Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:42:28Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-14T05:18:51Z
dc.identifier.issn0953-4814en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09534811211239209en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47688
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The aim of this paper is to examine the narratives of acceptance and resistance to the introduction of corporate environmentalism. Despite recognition that managers and senior executives play a primary role in corporate environmentalism, relatively few researchers have examined how top management supports, accepts, negotiates, disregards, or rejects the implementation of corporate environmentalism within their organization. By considering how members of a top management team reflect on corporate environmentalism the aim is to examine potential identity management conflicts that arise during the implementation of environmentally sustainable initiatives within organizations. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative approach was adopted to address the research aims. By taking this approach the paper examines the lived experience of the participants as they internalized corporate environmentalism as part of their identity and as part of the organizational identity. Data collection involved 15 semi-structured interviews with senior executives and board members of a large Australian hospital. Findings - Based on an in-depth thematic analysis of interview transcripts, it was found that individuals attributed a dominant discourse to corporate environmentalism based on their lived experience of organizational change for sustainability. Six dominant discourses were identified. Three were resistant to corporate environmentalism: the pragmatist, the traditionalist, and the observer; and three were supportive of corporate environmentalism: the technocentrist, holist, and ecopreneur. Originality/value - The findings demonstrate that although top management operated in and experienced the same organizational context, the narratives and identities they constructed in relation to sustainability varied widely. These findings emphasize the challenges inherent in developing an organizational identity that incorporates sustainability principles and the need for change management strategies to appeal to the diverse values and priorities of organizational managers and executives.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent189795 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom518en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto534en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Organizational Change Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOrganisational Behaviouren_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommerce, Management, Tourism and Services not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150311en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode159999en_US
dc.titleCorporate environmentalism and top management identity negotiationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Marketingen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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