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dc.contributor.authorBoettler, Ute
dc.contributor.authorVolz, Nadine
dc.contributor.authorTeller, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorHaupt, Larisa
dc.contributor.authorBakuradze, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorEisenbrand, Gerhard
dc.contributor.authorBytof, Gerhard
dc.contributor.authorLantz, Ingo
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Lyn
dc.contributor.authorMarko, Doris
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:39:32Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:39:32Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-06-28T01:48:28Z
dc.identifier.issn03014851
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11033-012-1547-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47716
dc.description.abstractThe Nrf2/ARE pathway is a major cellular defense mechanism that prevents damage by reactive oxygen species through induction of antioxidative phase II enzymes. However, the activity of the Nrf2/ARE system is not uniform with variability in response presumed to be dependent on the Nrf2 genotype. We recently completed a pilot human coffee intervention trial with healthy humans, where large interindividual differences in the antioxidative response to the study coffee were examined. Here, we address the question whether differences in the modulation of Nrf2 gene transcription, assessed as an induction of Nrf2 gene transcription by Q-PCR, might be correlated with specific Nrf2 genotypes. To date, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in the Nrf2 (NFE2L2) gene. Two of these, the -617C/A and -651G/A SNPs are located within the promoter region and have previously been reported to influence the activity of the Nrf2/ARE pathway by reducing Nrf2 transcriptional activity. Sequencing of the critical Nrf2 gene promoter region not only confirmed the existence of these SNPs within the participants of the trial at the expected frequency (33% carrying the -617C/A, 17% the -651G/A and 56% the -653A/G SNP) but also indicated reduced Nrf2 gene transcription associated with a normal diet if the SNPs at position -617, -651 or -653 were present. Of note, the data also indicated the study coffee increased Nrf2 gene transcription even in SNP carriers. This further highlights the relevance of genotype-dependent induction of Nrf2 gene transcription that appears to be largely influenced by dietary factors.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent240424 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom7155
dc.relation.ispartofpageto7162
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMolecular Biology Reports
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiochemistry and Cell Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0601
dc.titleInduction of antioxidative Nrf2 gene transcription by coffee in humans: depending on genotype?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Science
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Springer. This is an electronic version of an article published in Molecular Biology Reports, June 2012, Volume 39, Issue 6, pp 7155-7162. Molecular Biology Reports is available online at: http://link.springer.com// with the open URL of your article.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHaupt, Larisa
gro.griffith.authorGriffiths, Lyn
gro.griffith.authorBoettler, Ute


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