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dc.contributor.authorNesdale, Drewen_US
dc.contributor.authorNaito, Mikakoen_US
dc.contributor.editorFons Van de Vijveren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:50:58Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:50:58Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2007-04-03T21:59:16Z
dc.identifier.issn00220221en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/4774
dc.description.abstractThis study examined whether collectivism versus individualism influences participants' attitudes toward group-based bullying. Student members of a collectivistic culture (Japan; n = 158) versus an individualistic culture (Australia; n = 157) read about a school bullying episode. Collectivistic responses were predicted when the victim was a student from the same culture as the participant, and the classroom group had a norm of bullying versus helping. Individualistic responses were predicted when the participant learned that he or she was personally connected with the bully or the victim. Contrary to predictions, the participants' attitudes reflected the interaction of nationality and gender, with the gender difference being greater between the Japanese versus Australian participants. In contrast, the participants' behavior intentions mainly reflected their nationality-the Japanese participants revealed a greater likelihood of bullying, and a lower likelihood of helping a victim, than did the Australians. The implications for research on individualism-collectivism and bullying are discussed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.publisher.placeThousand Oaks, CAen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://jcc.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/5/537en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom537en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto556en_US
dc.relation.ispartofeditionSeptemberen_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume36en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380105en_US
dc.titleIndividualism-collectivism and the attitudes to school bullying of Japanese and Australian studentsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2005 Sage Publications. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. This journal is available online: http://jcc.sagepub.com/content/vol36/issue5/en_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorNesdale, Drew R.


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