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dc.contributor.authorBalfour, Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:17:08Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:17:08Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-17T03:10:08Z
dc.identifier.issn0266464Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0266464X12000036en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/47842
dc.description.abstractOne of the most unusual statistics in the study of performance and war is that aesthetic activity often increases in times of conflict. In this article Michael Balfour extends the consideration of performance and war to aesthetic projects that were located far removed from the centres of conflict, but that deeply connected with the affective impact of war. As an illustration of performative practice, the examples demonstrate the ways in which place making can play with documenting and representing war experiences in different ways. The two examples - This is Camp X-Ray in Manchester (a temporary installation) and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC - were designed in separate contexts for very different purposes; but contribute to understanding the kinds of choices that artists make in representing the affective 'truths' of war experience. In both cases, the artists were interested in creating spaces that would make the wars more visible for an audience, and provide a tangible place in which experiences of war could be re-conceived and an affective connection made. Michael Balfour is Professor of Applied Theatre, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. His research expertise is in the social applications of theatre, in particular theatre and war, prison theatre, and arts and health. Major Australian Research Council-funded projects include The Difficult Return, on approaches to artsbased work with returning military personnel, and Captive Audiences, on the impact of performing arts programmes in prisons. His books include Theatre and War 1933-1945 and, most recently, Performance in Place of War, co-authored with James Thompson and Jenny Hughes (Seagull Press, 2010).en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent933937 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto40en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNew Theatre Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDrama, Theatre and Performance Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode190404en_US
dc.titleMapping realities: representing war through affective place makingen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2012 Cambridge University Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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