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dc.contributor.authorPiquero, Alexen_US
dc.contributor.authorP. Farrington, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorM. G. Fontaine, Nathalieen_US
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Ginaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoid, Jeremyen_US
dc.contributor.authorUllrich, Simoneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:19:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:19:53Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T22:16:53Z
dc.identifier.issn10768971en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0027061en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/48186
dc.description.abstractPsychopathy has been a sustained interest among psychologists and, to a lesser extent, among criminologists. Studies on psychopathy have tended to focus on its measurement and predictive ability, primarily in adolescence and primarily among more serious offenders. This article moves beyond prior research on psychopathy and is the first to link childhood risk factors and offending trajectories measured through age 40 to psychopathy at age 48 in a community sample of several hundred South London males in the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development. Results show that although childhood environmental and, to a lesser extent, childhood individual risk factors are associated with a range of psychopathy measures, controlling for offending trajectories renders most of those childhood risks insignificant. Evidence also shows that while extreme scores of psychopathy are rare among this community sample, chronic offending is strongly linked to psychopathy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom577en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto598en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology, Public Policy, and Lawen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crimeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201en_US
dc.titleChildhood risk, offending trajectories, and psychopathy at age 48 years in the Cambridge study in delinquent developmenten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governanceen_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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