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dc.contributor.authorHearn, Laurence K
dc.contributor.authorHawker, Darryl W
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Jochen F
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-30T23:00:23Z
dc.date.available2017-11-30T23:00:23Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-06-07T06:01:10Z
dc.identifier.issn1309-1042
dc.identifier.doi10.5094/APR.2012.035
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/48260
dc.description.abstractConcentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined in air samples from near a large outdoor automotive shredding and metal recycling facility and the surrounding local area. This was done using a combination of active air samplers (AAS) measuring particle-associated and vapor-phase compounds, and, for the first time, passive air samplers (PAS) consisting of polyurethane foam (PUF) deployed at high spatial resolution around the facility. AAS data showed average levels of ?11PBDE in the adjacent commercial precinct (439Ჲ2 pg m-3) were on average a factor of 50 times higher than those in the residential area 1.5 km away (8.5ᳮ6 pg m-3). In addition, the PBDE composition in air was different between the commercial and residential areas with quantifiable concentrations for eleven PBDEs (BDE-28, -47, -100, -99, -153, -183, -197, -196, -206, -207 and -209) in the commercial area. In contrast, only five of these congeners were detected in the residential area. Congener BDE-209 dominated the profile in air at both active air monitoring sites (i.e. commercial and residential) and was entirely associated with the particulate-phase, contributing on average 63% of the ?11PBDE mass in samples. Congener composition in PAS deployed across the field study area (16 km2) were also dominated by BDE-209 with this congener representing 75% of the ?11PBDE mass in samples, a proportion similar to that observed in active samples. The attenuation of ?11PBDEs in PAS vs. distance from the recycling facility was best fitted using an empirical exponential decay model (r2=0.89). Model results indicated the major wind direction plays only a minor role in determining the observed spatial distribution of PBDEs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent434253 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTurkish National Committee for Air Pollution Research and Control (TUNCAP).
dc.publisher.placeTurkey
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom317
dc.relation.ispartofpageto324
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAtmospheric Pollution Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Chemistry (incl. Atmospheric Chemistry)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAtmospheric Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Engineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode039901
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0401
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0907
dc.titleDispersal patterns of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the vicinity of an automotive shredding and metal recycling facility
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2012. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the authors.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHawker, Darryl W.


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