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dc.contributor.authorKlenowski, Valen_US
dc.contributor.authorWyatt-Smith, Claireen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:47:22Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:47:22Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-28T02:20:50Z
dc.identifier.issn1465329Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0969594X.2011.592972en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/48454
dc.description.abstractHigh stakes testing in Australia was introduced in 2008 by way of the National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Currently, every year all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are assessed on the same days using national tests in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions (Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation) and Numeracy. In 2010 the NAPLAN results were published on the Federal Government MySchool website. The impact of these high stakes tests on jurisdictions, school principals, parents and students is considered in this article. We draw on reported observations from the Australian Primary Principals Association during 2009-10 testing periods across the country and published Australian research on the impact of high stakes literacy and numeracy testing. We also examine alternative approaches that include the use of assessment evidence for learning improvement purposes and for accountability purposes. In considering alternatives to the current large-scale testing approach we draw on key insights from research on teacher judgement, achievement standards and social moderation in the context of national curriculum and assessment reform in support of the suggested directions forward.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent189480 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom65en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto79en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAssessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Assessment and Evaluationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130303en_US
dc.titleThe impact of high stakes testing: the Australian storyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Taylor & Francis. This is an electronic version of an article published in Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, Volume 19, Issue 1, 2012, pages 65-79. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWyatt-Smith, Claire M.


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