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dc.contributor.authorMcCoy, Narelle
dc.contributor.editorJodie Taylor and David Baker
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-18T01:57:54Z
dc.date.available2017-12-18T01:57:54Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-03-10T23:47:36Z
dc.identifier.issn1030-4312
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10304312.2012.698040
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/49309
dc.description.abstractIn the traditional Irish ritual of the merry wake, death and sexuality were tied closely together. The mourning for the deceased was accompanied by excessive feasting and drinking while wake games of an overtly sexual nature were performed in the presence of the corpse. This voluptuous, uninhibited behaviour exhibited during the death ritual echoes the state of the mnᠣaointe or keening women who inhabited a liminal realm between the living and the world of the dead for the duration of the mourning period. This 'divine madness' allowed keeners to express the collective outpouring of grief through their voices and bodies, and lead the community in a public expression of sorrow and lament. This article will examine the significance of the mnᠣaointe in the wake ritual, in particular the power of the female voice in transcending the strictures of the world of the living and the brief period of licence which then ensued. As well, it will explore the connection between the role of the keener and the anarchic nature of the merry wake amusements, where the embodied voice leads the community to a place where the social order is suspended, and the chaotic nature of death is confronted.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom615
dc.relation.ispartofpageto624
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalContinuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMusicology and Ethnomusicology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCulture, Gender, Sexuality
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFilm, Television and Digital Media
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication and Media Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCultural Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode190409
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode200205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1902
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2001
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2002
dc.titleThe quick and the dead: Sexuality and the Irish merry wake
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland Conservatorium
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies on 27 Jul 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10304312.2012.698040
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMcCoy, Narelle


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