Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCassematis, PG
dc.contributor.authorWortley, R
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:00:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:00:54Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T22:58:59Z
dc.identifier.issn0167-4544
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10551-012-1548-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/49602
dc.description.abstractAbstract This study examined whether it was possible to classify Australian public sector employees as either whistleblowers or non-reporting observers using personal and situational variables. The personal variables were demography (gender, public sector tenure, organisational tenure and age), work attitudes (job satisfaction, trust in management, whistleblowing propensity) and employee behaviour (organisational citizenship behaviour). The situational variables were perceived personal victimisation, fear of reprisals and perceived wrongdoing seriousness. These variables were used as predictors in a series of binary logistic regressions. It was possible to identify whistleblowers on the basis of individual initiative, whistleblowing propensity (individual and organisational), fear of reprisals, perceived wrongdoing seriousness and perceived personal victimisation. It was concluded that whistleblowers are not markedly dissimilar to non-reporting observers. Based on the two most influential variables (perceived personal victimisation and perceived wrongdoing seriousness), the average Australian public sector whistleblower is most likely to be an ordinary employee making a good faith attempt to stop what they perceived to be a serious wrongdoing that was initially identified through personal victimisation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom615
dc.relation.ispartofpageto634
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Business Ethics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume117
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial and organisational psychology (incl. human factors)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied ethics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3506
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode520104
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode5001
dc.titlePrediction of Whistleblowing or Non-reporting Observation: The Role of Personal and Situational Factors
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCassematis, Peter G.
gro.griffith.authorWortley, Richard K.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record