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dc.contributor.convenorMarcus K Harmes
dc.contributor.authorRay-Barruel, Gillian
dc.contributor.editorMarcus K. Harmes, Lindsay Henderson, Barbara Harmes, Amy Antonio
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T12:00:53Z
dc.date.available2017-11-27T12:00:53Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-06-13T04:51:11Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.usq.edu.au/oac/Research/bwc
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/49900
dc.description.abstractUntil the 1840s, "idiocy" was considered incurable, but this changed after S駵in's work in Paris showed intellectual improvements with special education in children classed as "idiots," sparking an optimistic flurry of asylum building throughout Britain and the western world. With the concentration of "idiot" children in purpose-built asylums, children's behaviour increasingly came under scrutiny by the newfound medical, psychiatric and education specialists. Early optimism soon faded, as overcrowded institutions failed to meet expectations and the rise of eugenics over the succeeding decades resulted in the discourse on intellectual disability becoming progressively more negative. The introduction of mandatory elementary schooling across England in 1870 placed large numbers of poor and working-class children under surveillance for the first time and led to a plethora of new definitions and stratification of intellectual disability. Despite the touting by religious organizations of a Christian duty to provide for people with disabilities, motives for the development of special education were not solely compassion and humanitarian concerns. By the fin-de-si裬e special education had evolved from an educative ideal of improving the prospects of intellectually disabled children to segregating those children classified as "feeble-minded" and "idiots" as a measure to reduce crime and degeneracy in the population. This paper traces the shift in discourses of idiocy and feeble-mindedness, proposing suggestions for why this shift occurred and how this history has shaped the current state of special education for children with intellectual difference.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent261199 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSouthern Queensland University
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttps://eprints.usq.edu.au/21992/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameThe British World: Religion, Memory, Society, Culture
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleThe British World: Religion, Memory, Society, Culture
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2012-07-02
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2012-07-05
dc.relation.ispartoflocationToowoomba, Australia
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology of Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160809
dc.titleThe Legacy of Special Education in Victorian England
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2012. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRay-Barruel, Gillian A.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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