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dc.contributor.authorYang, Liu-Qin
dc.contributor.authorSpector, Paul E
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Juan I
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Tammy D
dc.contributor.authorPoelmans, Steven
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Cary L
dc.contributor.authorLapierre, Laurent M
dc.contributor.authorO'Driscoll, Michael P
dc.contributor.authorAbarca, Nureya
dc.contributor.authorAlexandrova, Matilda
dc.contributor.authorAntoniou, Alexandros-Stamatios
dc.contributor.authorBeham, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorBrough, Paula
dc.contributor.authorCarikci, Ilker
dc.contributor.authorFerreiro, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorFraile, Guillermo
dc.contributor.authorGeurts, Sabine
dc.contributor.authorKinnunen, Ulla
dc.contributor.authorLu, Chang-qin
dc.contributor.authorLu, Luo
dc.contributor.authorMoreno-Velazquez, Ivonne F
dc.contributor.authorPagon, Milan
dc.contributor.authorPitariu, Horea
dc.contributor.authorSalamatov, Volodymyr
dc.contributor.authorSiu, Oi-ling
dc.contributor.authorShima, Satoru
dc.contributor.authorSchulmeyer, Marion K
dc.contributor.authorTillemann, Kati
dc.contributor.authorWiderszal-Bazyl, Maria
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jong-Min
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-05T04:21:06Z
dc.date.available2019-04-05T04:21:06Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-03-26T22:33:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0047-2506
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/jibs.2011.58
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/49907
dc.description.abstractSurveying 6509 managers from 24 countries/geopolitical entities, we tested the process through which individualism-collectivism at the country level relates to employees' appraisals of and reactions to three types of work demands (i.e., work hours, workload, and organizational constraints). Our multilevel modeling results suggested that, while working the same number of hours, employees from individualistic countries reported a higher perceived workload than their counterparts in collectivistic countries. Furthermore, relationships of perceived workload and organizational constraints with job dissatisfaction and turnover intentions were stronger in individualistic than in collectivistic countries. Importantly, results of supplementary analyses suggested that the cultural value of individualism-collectivism moderated the mediation effect of perceived workload between work hours and both job dissatisfaction and turnover intentions. Our findings highlight the need to expand contemporary theories of work stress by applying multilevel approaches and incorporating cross-national differences in dimensions such as individualism-collectivism while studying how employees appraise and react to important work stressors.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom424
dc.relation.ispartofpageto443
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of International Business Studies
dc.relation.ispartofvolume43
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial and Organisational Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170107
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1402
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1505
dc.titleIndividualism-collectivism as a moderator of the work demands-strains relationship: A cross-level and cross-national examination
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBrough, Paula


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